Café Outfitter: Teas for Spring

Café Outfitter

Serepdipitea

Clouds are clearing, temperatures are warming, and iced tea season is imminent. For those hesitant to dive headfirst into the pool of chilled beverages, there are lots of versatile tea options to smooth the transition to spring. Spicy, floral, herbal, soothing, and bright, these offerings are sure to melt away the last of winter’s gloomy days.

A Source of Inspiration
Did you think spice teas were limited to winter sipping? That may be true for recipes with ingredients like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, but TeaSource encourages you to switch up your spices as you cruise into spring. Try Sweet Ginger Green—packed with green tea, ginger root, lemongrass, lemon peel, and honey crystals. Brew it hot on chilly days, or add ice for a refreshing sunny-day tea.

You’ll Spring for These Teas
Ring in the spring with SerendipiTea’s most recent tea offerings. Floral scents highlight their Casanova, Fu Man Chu, and Cotillion blends, celebrating spring’s new growth. For a quick pick-me-up on gloomy days, try the Dark ChocolaTea to lift your spirits—the rich blend contains phenylethylamine and tryptophan, which stimulate the release of serotonin.

Wake Up from a Long Winter
Tony Tellin, head teamaker at Steven Smith Teamaker, recommends Smith’s Kandy blend through the transition to spring. “As winter starts to wane and mother nature starts to stir, we transition from rich, full, round, and soul-quenching to bright, crisp, lively, and floral flavor experiences,” Tellin says. Made from three premier teas from Sri Lanka, the Kandy blend is marked by notes of caramelized sugar, minerality, and bright and lively floral undertones.

Tea with a Purpose
Two Leaves and a Bud offers four versatile tea flavors in its new Purpose-Filled Tea line. Fully organic and grown outside in the sunshine, Detox, Hydrate, Invigorate herbal blends, and Energize green tea are perfectly suited for hot and cold brewing. Two Leaves celebrates the outdoors by donating 1 percent of every Purpose-Filled Tea sale to Protect Our Winters, the leading climate advocacy group for the outdoor sports community.

The Art of Matcha-Making
Los Angeles–based direct tea importer Art of Tea relies on a classic to help transition through the seasons: matcha. For a traditional preparation—which makes a fresh, grassy, and sweet drink—whisk matcha into hot water, then froth. Matcha can also be made cold; simply add a teaspoon of powder to eight ounces of cold water, stir until fully mixed, then add ice for a refreshing, organic beverage.